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Thank you for all who attending the Peggy Smedley Institute on Monday, April 4.
We hope to see you at the next event!

The inaugural meeting of The Peggy Smedley Institute was held on Monday, April 4, 2016 in San Francisco, Calif. As a spinoff of the much larger Connected World Conference, The Peggy Smedley Institute meeting was a full-day of education and networking on IoT (Internet of Things) topics for enterprise leaders with an emphasis on smart cities, energy, transportation, mobility, retail, manufacturing and engineering. Sessions focused on IoT as it relates to the emergence of novel concepts in innovation, manufacturing, maintenance, repair, service, and so much more.

What: The Peggy Smedley Institute was a full-day of education sessions including lunch, tabletop displays of products, a welcome reception, and closing the event, a dinner celebrating the 2016 Connected World WoM2M winners.

Focus on Manufacturing: The IoT is playing a grand role in tackling the problems of the aging, public and private infrastructures, and revamping industrial manufacturing. Companies that look to forge new pathways to understanding how to leverage the values to be achieved through full-scale adoption of the IoT will be the beneficiaries of grand new monitoring systems and architectures. We are charting a new course and creating a vision for what once was far-reaching applications that are now accessible and necessary.

Manufacturing is in a transitory state. The things that are used in everyday life are getting smarter and more social: They interact with humans and other smart machines in realtime at an unprecedented rate. Making smart machines requires new, out of the box thinking. The old factory paradigm no longer applies. Our focus in the meeting is to provide attendees with an understanding of the new manufacturing paradigm created by the Internet of Things.

Facts You Should Know: IoT is important to the manufacturing space. PwC surveyed U.S. manufacturers to learn more about what they are doing to make sure they are on track to building more advanced data-driven businesses, it found that:

  • 35% of U.S. manufacturers are currently collecting and using data generated by smart sensors to enhance manufacturing/operating processes
  • 34% believe it is “extremely critical” U.S. manufacturers adopt an IoT strategy in their operations
  • 38% currently embed sensors in products that enable end-users/customers to collect sensor-generated data

Why This is Important: Manufacturers are on board but they have a ways to go—with more than 60% in the industry not yet taking strides toward IoT adoption.

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